Classroom in Burkina Faso: The 'average' African primary school classroom has 41 pupils and one teacher. (Photo/ Jessica Lea/DFID).

Crowded Classrooms: In Some African Countries, It’s 60 Pupils Or More For One Teacher

Education quality has not kept up with demand in Africa; in some cases the situation so dire that pupils in school are not much better off than those who missed school.


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Boy in a Zanzibar school. Repeaters tend to be boys from rural, disadvantaged backgrounds. (Photo/ Flickr/ Andrea Moroni)

The Frog-Pond Effect: Repeaters In African Schools

Repetition rarely leads to better performance. Pupils become discouraged at having to do the classwork again, feel awkward at being the oldest in their new class and being left behind by their peers


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A calf crosses the border between Botswana and Zambia. Uneducated people - who may work in agriculture with animals like these - are the most likely to be in favour of free movement across borders in Africa. (Photo/ Flickr/ Mario Micklisch)

The Most Cosmopolitan African Is The Illiterate Villager. Seriously

You might imagine that a university or college education would give you a broader, more cosmopolitan worldview; that the more educated you are, the less parochial you would become. The data suggests otherwise.


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A burning school. Kenyan students have become world champions at torching their school buildings, especially dormitories. (Photo/River Mc Gregor/Flickr). BURNING SCHOOL

Kenya’s School Arson Crisis: Fire Will Get You Listened To, And Students Know It

It is part of a broader reactionary mode of governance, which teenagers are already aware of – that citizen initiatives are ignored until they pose a direct threat to property and the public peace.


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Child marriage in Ethiopia: Bossena (blue t-shirt) got married when she was 15. She’s now divorced. (Photo/ Jessica Lea/ DFID)

Child Marriage In Africa: Tough Bans In Tanzania And The Gambia, But The Problem Is The System

School officials are allowed to expel pregnant girls, and they often do, to prevent the girls being a “bad influence” on others. That means that in most cases, getting married is the only option available to pregnant girls.